Tips for Cyber Security in Your Veterinary Practice: PART II

With the risk of a cyber security breach increasing on a daily basis, below are some tips that will help a practice owner maintain the security that they need in order to protect safeguard data.

Plan for the Unexpected

? Unless your confidential data is totally disconnected from the internet, you must install a firewall to protect against intrusions from outside sources.

? Software firewalls, from somewhere like Indeni, are included with some popular operating systems, providing protection at the installation stage.

? Alternatively, separate firewall software is widely available from computer security developers.

? Large practices that use a Local Area Network (LAN) should consider a hardware firewall.

? A hardware firewall sits between LAN and the Internet, providing centralized management of firewall settings.

Install and Maintain Anti-virus Software

? Use an anti-virus product that provides continuously updated protection against viruses, malware, and other code that can attack your computers through web downloads, CDs, email, and flash drives.

? Keep anti-virus software up-to-date.

? Most anti-virus software automatically generates reminders about these updates, and many are configurable to allow for automated updating.

 
Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. handles a wide range of legal issues for the veterinary profession including employment law, cyber security, practice sales, real estate transactions, lease agreements, OSHA compliance, veterinary board complaints, and entity formation.

For questions or comments regarding this article please call (770) 554-1400 or visit www.obermanlaw.comIf you would like Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. to speak at an event, please contact Katharine Drum, Marketing Coordinator (kath@obermanlaw.com).

Tips for Cyber Security in Your Veterinary Practice: PART I

With the risk of a cyber-security breach increasing on a daily basis, below are some tips that will help a practice owner maintain the security that they need in order to protect patient information.

Use Strong Passwords and Change Them Regularly

Selecting Passwords

Choose a password that is not easily guessed. Below are some examples of strong password characteristics:

❒ At least eight characters in length (the longer the better).

❒ A combination of upper case and lower case letters, one number, and at least one special character, such as a punctuation mark.

Strong passwords should not include personal information, such as:

❒ Birthdate

❒ Names of self, family members, or pets

❒ Social Security Number

❒ Anything that is on your social networking sites or could otherwise be easily discovered by others.

Updating Passwords

Configure your systems so that passwords must be changed on a regular basis.

Resetting Passwords

To discourage staff from writing down their passwords, develop a password reset process to provide quick assistance in case of forgotten passwords. This process could involve:

❒ Allowing two different staff members to be authorized to reset passwords

❒ Selecting a product that has built-in password reset capabilities.

Limit Network Access

❒ Prohibit staff from installing software without prior approval.

❒ When a wireless router is used, set it up to operate only in encrypted mode.

❒ Prohibit casual network access by visitors.

❒ Check to make sure file sharing, instant messaging, and other peer-to-peer applications have not been installed without explicit review and approval.

Control Physical Access

❒ Limit the chances that devices (e.g., laptops, handhelds, desktops, servers, thumb drives, CCs, backup tapes) may be tampered with, lost, or stolen.

❒ Document and enforce policies limiting physical access to devices and information.

❒ Keep machines in locked rooms.

❒ Manage keys to facilities.

❒ Restrict removal of devices from a secure area.

 

 

 

Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. handles a wide range of legal issues for the veterinary profession including employment law, cyber security, practice sales, real estate transactions, lease agreements, OSHA compliance, veterinary board complaints, and entity formation.
For questions or comments regarding this article please call (770) 554-1400 or visit www.obermanlaw.com
If you would like Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. to speak at an event, please contact Katharine Drum, Marketing Coordinator (kath@obermanlaw.com).

Cyber Breaches in Businesses – The New Frontier

Cyber security in a business is becoming more and more complicated. In fact, most businesses have little or no cyber security measures.

Hackers like to target small businesses because they know that a small business owner typically does not have the resources for more sophisticated (and more expensive) security defenses.
How can a business owner secure patient data in a digital world?

 

1. Set up and enforce a strict computer and Internet use policy that restricts employees from reading and downloading personal email while using an office computer.

2. Hire an experienced IT company to set up a strict firewall on your office network. If your business uses wireless, have the IT company hide your wireless network from public view.

3. Train your employees on how viruses infect computers with common user habits such as forwarding personal email messages and downloading computer wallpapers.

4. Keep all anti-virus and anti-malware software updated along with computer operating systems.

5. Always create strong passwords of more than 8 characters that use mixed-case letters and include numbers and symbols.

6. Keep business and home computing separate. Don’t use a laptop at home for fun and then bring it into the office for use on the business network. Business computers should strictly be used for business.

 

 

With the proliferation of cyber breaches in businesses, data security is no longer an option.

iStock_000038374680XLarge_Resized

Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. handles a wide range of legal issues for the business community including business transitions, sales, real estate transactions, lease agreements, employment law and entity formation.
For questions or comments regarding this article please call (770) 554-1400 or visit  www.obermanlaw.com

If you would like Stuart J. Oberman, Esq. to speak at an event, please contact Katharine Drum, Marketing Coordinator (kath@obermanlaw.com).

 

Sign up for our Newsletter!